Los Angeles Independent Publishing

Lesbian Books

Red Hen Press, a Los Angeles independent publisher founded by Kate Gale, offers poetry readings, poetry contests, book awards, and more.

Los Angeles Independent Publishing

Lesbian Books

Red Hen Press, a Los Angeles independent publisher founded by Kate Gale, offers poetry readings, poetry contests, book awards, and more.

Reviews




The American Journal of Poetry features yet another poem by Red Hen author Dean Kostos. The journal praises Dean's past and recent publications as well as acknowledges awards won by his poetry.

The ancient masters encounter the modern world in John Barr’s inventive new poetry collection Dante in China, a book that poses a triple threat: entertaining, educational and enlightening.

TBT! In a mid-April review, Midwest Book Review recommended Anne Edelstein's memoir Lifesaving for Beginners. The recommendation reads, "It is no surprise that Lifesaving for Beginners is an deftly crafted, engagingly presented, intensely personal memoir that is a truly riveting read from beginning to end, and an especially and unreservedly recommended addition to both community and academic library Contemporary American Biography collections."

In a recent review, Sarah Leamy provides a detailed summary of tammy lynee stoner's novel Sugar Land. Describing the book and stoner's characters, Leamy claims, "These characters linger and are quite unforgettable. It’s very much a Southern book in language and with Stoner’s observations that are wry and thoughtful. Sugar Land spans decades in a well-told, easy going manner and I finished the book with a satisfied smile." To read the full review, among other Red Hen titles' reviews, visit Sarah's blog.

Athens, Georgia magazine Flagpole reviewed Bradley Bazzle's recently published (and first!) novel Trash Mountain as part of a short summer reading list. "With a finely drawn young protagonist, Ben, and a gigantic dump next door to his home . . . [the mountain of trash] is the central character in this book, a multifaceted character that encompasses and compresses all the strands of modern life," reviewer Pete McCommons writes. McCommons concludes, "This is a fine, fun, highly original book. Even though its author is from around here, it’s not an Athens book in subject matter. Rather, it is universal in its reach into the human heart and in its effort to find treasure amid the trash." Read the entire review here.

In a recent review, Booklist Review's Jonathan Fullmer describes Bryan Hurt's collection Everyone Wants to Be Ambassador to France as "18 amusingly eccentric stories." Despite containing distinct stories with quite different settings and characters, Fullmer notes that the topic of love persists, writing that Hurt’s collection "deals with young love, misguided love, and failed attempts at expressing love." Fullmer also acknowledges Bryan's talented writing: "While heavy on fantastical elements, Hurt’s tales often strike a painfully funny chord and pinpoint striking observations about humanity’s quirky side." Read the entire review in Booklist's next issue.

In Foreword Review's September and October edition, Hannah Hohman reviews Tammy Lynne Stoner's novel Sugar Land. Summarizing the novel's main plot points, Hohman concludes that "Sugar Land is a raw, spiraling, and hopeful story about a woman who wishes that she didn’t love as she does, and the life she leads in the wake of her self-realizations." Hohman percieves that protagonist Dara's struggles with self-identity are intensified as a result of the novel's 1920s Texas setting. And yet, this is what makes the novel that much more believable and painful. Hohman writes, "Much of what occurs in the novel is difficult to swallow, in great part because the story takes place in a time when Dara’s identity is not readily accepted, even by herself. Still, it’s the novel’s realism that makes Dara’s story so gripping."

Davis Mason's THE SOUND was recently reviewed by Stanford University's Cynthia Haven on her blog, THE BOOK HAVEN! She refers to Mason's poems as "centripetal" and "mesmerizing". Read the full review here!

Midwest Book Review provided a short review of Peggy Shumaker's latest work Cairn: New and Selected. A collection of poems which encompass Peggy's experiences in Alaska and Arizona, Midwest Book Review writes that "Cairn: New & Selected represents a major body of work [that] leads the reader deep into what remains unresolved, savoring mysteries of heart, mind, and soul." "An especially and unreservedly recommended addition to both community and acadmic library American Poetry collections," Midwest Book Review applauds Peggy's impressive collection.

Martha K. Davis' SCISSORS, PAPER, STONE was recently reviewed by Gertrude Press' Jess Travers. The novel, narrated in alternating chapters by Catherine, her adopted daughter Min, and Min's best friend Laura, spans twenty years of love, loss, and the complex reality of female relationships. Seeing similarites between her own experiences and those of Martha's characters, in "Realizing Queer Kinship," Travers applauds Martha for creating such a compelling novel and "ruptur[ing] the construct of kinship." Travers writes, "Scissors, Paper, Stone reminds me to keep putting pressure on my own prejudices about what makes family, and it challenges me to keep rethinking desire. These are not easy tasks for a book to take on, but Davis' novel rises to the occasion by pointing to the limitations of defining family by way of biology or ethnicity and by inviting the possibility for kinship to be realized in divergent, queer ways."

Michelle Anne Schlinger from Foreword Review gives an in-depth review of Cai Emmons' upcoming title WEATHER WOMAN. Taking a close look at characters and plot, Schlinger praises the work of fiction: "The novel may fit the almanac definition of a work of magical realism, but its appeal lies in its deeper truths . . . The novel doesn’t lead with its politics, but it still functions beautifully as an ecofeminist allegory."

In her recent review of Doug Lawson's Big Foots in Paradise on her website, Sarah Leamy says that, "Doug Lawson Writes with confidence and his prose is lyrical, poetic and he comfortably blends dark comedy and empathic observations."

"'The Wilderness' broaches subjects both infinite and infinitesimal, contemplating cosmic forces and commas on an equal scale," writes Jessica Weber of UCR Today in this review and interview with Maurya Simon. Check out the full article here!

Loren W. Cooper's CrossTown is getting great visibility. An excerpt of the book is quoted in a blog from New Zealand.

"This book is fearless, even in its confrontation of fear and trauma."

Chelsea Clammer is praised for Circadian by the US Review of Books. They write, "In this volume, the author proves that no topic is taboo, especially with the right choice of words." Read the full review here.

Congratulations to Steve Almond for his first newspaper feature for BAD STORIES on PORTLAND MERCURY. Read the review here!

You can read the full review of Loren W. Cooper's CrossTown on the Midwest Book Review's website, but here's a taste of what it contains : "[CrossTown is] an impressively original and deftly scripted novel by an author with a genuine flair for imaginative and narrative driven storytelling." Thanks Midwest Book Review.

The Midwest Book Review describes Florencia Ramirez's Eat Less Water as "an extraordinary and life-changing read that is very highly recommended." Thanks Midwest Book Review! Check out the full review here.

Los Angeles Independent Publishing

Lesbian Books

Red Hen Press, a Los Angeles independent publisher founded by Kate Gale, offers poetry readings, poetry contests, book awards, and more.